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Posts Tagged ‘Heartland Policy Studies’

Lessons from the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program
Written By: George A. Clowes, Ph.D.
Publisher: The Hertland Institute

This Heartland Policy Study by education expert George Clowes addresses concerns about the efficacy of school vouchers that have been raised recently by some school reform advocates. The author distinguishes between “charity vouchers” and universal vouchers and explains why the former are unlikely to cause systemic reform of public schools. However, new data on the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program show that even charity vouchers demonstrate the reforming potential of school choice. Reform advocates shouldn’t give up on vouchers, Clowes concludes.

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Written By: Gary MacDougal, Kate Campaigne, Dane Wendell
Publisher: The Heartland Institute

Welfare Reform after Ten Years assigns grades to the 50 states and the District of Columbia based on how they implemented the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), which gave states unprecedented flexibility in implementing welfare reform.

The six states with the most successful anti-poverty programs are Maryland, Idaho, Illinois, Florida, Virginia, and California. The five with the least success are Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Kansas, Vermont, and Missouri. The states’ overall ranking is an average of two separate analyses — anti-poverty success and welfare reform policies — evaluating a total of 12 variables.

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Written By: Michael Van Winkle
Publisher: The Heartland Institute

Choice & Education Across the States ranks state efforts to increase accountability and improve student achievement with four kinds of school choice: vouchers, charters, tax credits, and public school choice.

With 23 being the highest possible score on the evaluation, the median score was just five points. However, many states are experimenting with choice as a way to provide a quality public education. A few states, like Arizona and Florida—scoring 15 and 14, respectively (grades of A in the curved grading system)—are innovating at an impressive pace, willing to try new and better ways to educate children.

Other states are not keeping pace and seem committed to preserving the largely choice-free status quo: Washington and Montana scored just one point each.

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